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Worldizing sound recordings as made popular by Sound Designer Walter Murch

December 21, 2015 3:18pm

Check out this video by Hugo Pereira about the technique of worldizing sound recordings as made popular by Sound Designer Walter Murch. Worldizing is manipulating sound until it seemed to be something that existed in real space. This refers to playing back existing recordings through a speaker or speakers in real-world acoustic situations, and recording that playback with microphones so that the new recording takes on the acoustic characteristics of the place it was "re-recorded."

Back in 1973, Walter Murch was working on American Graffiti and trying to create something new with the film's Wolfman Jack sound material -- commercials, hit songs, DJ rants. His task was to turn the soundtrack into a cohesive soundscape, to make every car cruising the city of Modesto, California a player in a citywide radiophonic symphony. The idea was that every teenage car in this town was turned to the same station, and, therefore, anywhere you went in the town, you heard this sound echoing off the buildings and passing by in cars.

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